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View Full Version : Regulations about towing non-licesned vehicle with a car dolly


Ken47
02-24-2011, 11:03 AM
I was wondering if any folks on here know if it is legal to tow an unlicensed vehicle in Alberta with a 2-wheeled car dolly? U-haul says the towed vehicle needs to be licensed, but that may be their insurance/liability requirements?
Thanks, Ken

Old Fart
02-24-2011, 11:18 AM
Prolly different than here in B.C., butt here, if the trailer has a license, the car need not have one, OR vice versa???? I might be wrong about this as I'm not really into towing vehicles other than a traval trailer....

Ratmotor
02-24-2011, 12:32 PM
Probably an insurance issue. As far as I know here you can tow an unlicensed car no problem as long as it is secured correctly. I finally bought a car trailer....

Rocket88
02-24-2011, 04:19 PM
In B.C. the car you are dollying (is that even a word?) needs to have insurance on it, as it is touching the road. If it's uninsured, you can put a permit on it and dolly it home that way.

1Bad56
02-24-2011, 06:40 PM
I was wondering if any folks on here know if it is legal to tow an unlicensed vehicle in Alberta with a 2-wheeled car dolly? U-haul says the towed vehicle needs to be licensed, but that may be their insurance/liability requirements?
Thanks, Ken

If you trailer it, no problem, but if you put it on a 2-wheel dolly, most likely has to be insured and licensed.
However, to be sure, phone a registery.
You might have to buy a day permit to move the vehicle if you use a 2-wheel dolly.

wayne
02-24-2011, 07:29 PM
In B.C you must have insu.on car- I have a dolly

parklane
02-24-2011, 09:50 PM
I have tow dollied and flat towedall over US and a lot of Canada, without any problem. Never been stoppedby police.

Having said that, I always say, it much easier begging for forgiveness, then asking for permission. ;)

cash
02-24-2011, 10:30 PM
i believe in alberta that whatever your towing is covered by the vehicle towing it but only public liability. you don't need proof of insurance to licence trailers in alberta.

Old Fart
02-24-2011, 11:49 PM
Prolly different than here in B.C., butt here, if the trailer has a license, the car need not have one, OR vice versa???? I might be wrong about this as I'm not really into towing vehicles other than a traval trailer....

I towed ya I MIGHT be wrong??? :o

modelAbone
02-25-2011, 09:53 AM
im sure that only the dolly is covered under the pullin vehicles insurance as it is a trailer the unit on it isnt part of the trailer and because its tires are touchin the road surface it has too be insured . i know that last time i rented a dolly the guy asked me if the unit was insured

juice03
02-25-2011, 10:25 AM
A guy that just bought a truck off me last week said the same thing about the vehicle on the dolly has to be plated and insured. He rented a dolly as well from U-Haul. He just told them that he had to tow his daily driver to mechanic shop and they let him take it.
I think that is just a U-Haul policy, 100% of the cars I tow on my car trailer have no insurance since there projects. If they change that law then insurance company will most likely offer a rider policy for trailers and the content on it.

Like "Cash" said trailers don't need insurance to be plated so that could run into a insure/plate law eventually. I don't insure my trailer since it isn't worth it but my coverage on my truck covers if an accident happens with the trailer but no replace/repair of the trailer. But if the vehicle I have on the trailer falls off and kills someone I could be sued since the content on the trailer is not covered.

johnny37
02-25-2011, 12:01 PM
OK, I've read two pages of this. He asked about DOLLYING a car behind his vehicle, and got all kinds of answers about TRAILERS. You all know they are totally different right?? I live in BC, don't know the laws in Alberta so I've stayed quit til now. As I don't know the Alberta laws, I have no opinion of legal or not. My point is, he asked about a dolly. Quit talking about frigging trailers.:eek:

juice03
02-25-2011, 12:36 PM
Just to let you know a DOLLY is actually a TRAILER as well :p you still need to put a trailer plate on a dolly therefore it's a trailer. lmao

Ken47
02-25-2011, 01:02 PM
My perference would be to use a car hauler trailer as opposed to a dolly to transport the car. I want to take it for the muffler system installation. When I went to U-haul to see about renting a car hauler trailer they said my pick-up truck (2005 Chevy Colorado 2WD with class 1 hitch) was not big enough. Then they asked what I was putting on the trailer and I said a 47 Ford coupe. They they said they didn't have a listing for a 47 Ford coupe in their computer so they couldn't rent me the trailer anyway (why I even go there is beyond me). I thought that getting access to a dolly from an RV-er would be easier than geting access to a car hauler trailer. Thanks for all the posts though. It does seem like there is a lot of dfferent understandings as to what the rules and regs are.

sqhd
02-25-2011, 01:30 PM
Just buy an "A to B" licence from Alberta Motor Vehicle and insure it for one day.

Carl

juice03
02-25-2011, 02:40 PM
Sounds like a real pain in the a$$. A dolly with a Class 1 would be fine, the goof behind the counter is basing everything by a computer. What happen happen to the good old days, lol when you felt releived that the straps held and it made it to the muffler shop.

My perference would be to use a car hauler trailer as opposed to a dolly to transport the car. I want to take it for the muffler system installation. When I went to U-haul to see about renting a car hauler trailer they said my pick-up truck (2005 Chevy Colorado 2WD with class 1 hitch) was not big enough. Then they asked what I was putting on the trailer and I said a 47 Ford coupe. They they said they didn't have a listing for a 47 Ford coupe in their computer so they couldn't rent me the trailer anyway (why I even go there is beyond me). I thought that getting access to a dolly from an RV-er would be easier than geting access to a car hauler trailer. Thanks for all the posts though. It does seem like there is a lot of dfferent understandings as to what the rules and regs are.

1Bad56
02-25-2011, 03:52 PM
went to U-haul to see about renting a car hauler trailer they said my pick-up truck (2005 Chevy Colorado 2WD with class 1 hitch) was not big enough. Then they asked what I was putting on the trailer and I said a 47 Ford coupe. They they said they didn't have a listing for a 47 Ford coupe in their computer so they couldn't rent me the trailer anyway (why I even go there is beyond me).

Another varible just added to the equation...hitch classes.
U-haul was correct that a class 1 hitch would not be able to tow the trailer and the car, you would need at least a class 3 hitch for the weight.


Class 1 hitches tow up to 2,000 pounds or 907 kilograms; they can be used to pull a trailer that is six feet or 1.8 meters long, or a boat that is 14 feet or 4.3 meters long. These hitches are good for use on smaller cars, such as small sedans, sports cars, and compact cars. Although some class 1 hitches are only available in designs that attach to the bumper, a hitch that attaches to the frame in some fashion is more desirable. You can also get a hitch with a removable tongue, so that when you’re not towing anything you don’t have to have a hitch sticking out of the back end of your car; however, if you plan on towing frequently, you are probably better off with a hitch that has a permanently affixed tongue.

Class 2 hitches tow up to 3,500 pounds or 1,588 kilograms; they can be used to pull a trailer that is 12 feet or 3.7 meters long, or a boat that is 20 feet or 6 meters long. These hitches work well on larger cars, such as midsize sedans and minivans, but are not suitable for compact cars. Like all larger hitches, class 2 hitches attach to the frame of a vehicle.

Class 3 hitches are more heavy-duty hitches. They come in different sizes, but the largest of them can tow up to 5,000 pounds or 2,268 kilograms. A class 3 hitch can be used to pull a 24-foot or 7-meter boat trailer.

Class 4 hitches are also much more heavy-duty hitches, especially because their mounting brackets distribute weight more evenly along the frame of the truck that is doing the towing. Class 4 hitches are designed for use with full-size trucks, and will easily pull 7,500 pounds or 3,402 kilograms.


Class 5 hitches are the largest hitches available. Like class 4 hitches, they utilize heavy-duty mounting brackets designed to distribute weight more evenly along the frame of the truck, which helps prevent an uneven load from being placed on the driveshafts or suspension in the rear of the car. Class 5 hitches can pull as much as 14,000 pounds or 6,350 kilograms.

A class 1 hitch with a RV-dolly might get away with it, but RV's always have class 3's as a minimum.

41chevcoe
02-25-2011, 09:39 PM
[QUOTE=Ken47;105116] When I went to U-haul to see about renting a car hauler trailer they said my pick-up truck (2005 Chevy Colorado 2WD with class 1 hitch) was not big enough. QUOTE]

That is good advice from U-Haul, how far do you have to go?, are you friends with any tow companies that like cash?, any friends got a full sized truck?:)

wayne
02-26-2011, 12:21 AM
OK I have used a dolly all over canada,USA & mex.for the last 30 years,every prov.is diff. every state is diff.& same for mex. so if your only using it in one prov.find out the rules.If your traveling all over get both insu. as some ploice are also paid commission.

Martin
02-26-2011, 05:10 AM
Just shows how complicated a "simple"? thing is.
Again this is with regards to BC (sorry) and yes these have been touched in the other posts but I do have an extra or two to add.

I thought (I may be wrong) that ICBC was government run and therefore you would think that the same law applies throughout Canada? I believe its just the personal insurance where you can go to a different company

The below is direct from my insurance broker

1) With a dolly, two wheels of the dollied car are touching the road therefore the dollied car has to have insurance, this is the same insurance as a tag for driving.

2) If all wheels are off of the ground and the car is on a trailer the trailered car does not need insurance, however, if the car comes off of the trailer the car is not insured and the individual is liable for all costs resulting from the potential damage that the car causes weather to property or individuals. (scary)

3) The trailer does not need insurance as the towing vehicles insurance covers the trailer but not the contents of/on the trailer.

I guess if anyone is contemplating doing this cross province borders it may have a larger bearing with regards to insurance.

I've always insured our trailer (not car trailer) but we were told last year by our insurance broker that trailer insurance was to protect us from any claim resulting from when the trailer is not attached to our vehicle (as well as theft of the trailer).

It may not help with the original question but its a bit of info that may come in handy.

Ken47
02-26-2011, 03:29 PM
I just checked my hitch. It is a class 3 not a class 1. The info on the hitch classes is useful though. I towed the 47 from Thunder Bay, where I bought it, to Kingston Ont (1976) (with a 52 Chev 1/2 ton I had then - we looked like a travelling junk yard) with a tow bar, no lights, did have safety chains, but nothing else and no issues - ah, those were the days... or were they? :) When I moved to Calgary from Kingston (2000) my compay moved it via a car transport company - much easier I must say! :)
ken

bullet
02-26-2011, 05:01 PM
I get a chuckle here in rural NS. How many years ago was it when you last saw someone doing 80 klms on a public road towing another vehicle with a rope and the police not even giving them a second look. I had to shake my head.

johnny37
02-27-2011, 02:28 AM
I thought (I may be wrong) that ICBC was government run and therefore you would think that the same law applies throughout Canada?.

If you think about it for a second, you'll realize ICBC stands for Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. Thats why the rules are for B.C. only. The B.C. Gov't runs it, not the federal gov't. Good thing too, since if the feds ran it, we know it would be worse than it already is.

Martin
02-27-2011, 05:59 AM
Aha, its a learning process.

1Bad56
03-01-2011, 06:59 PM
A phone call to a Registery didn't help much so I sent an enquiry off to the Alta Gov't.
Their answer is:

Insurance and registration is required by both the towed motor vehicle and the dolly, if they are in contact with the roadway. Alberta's Traffic Safety Act section 52(1)(d) requires motor vehicles and trailers to be registered. Section 54(1)(b) requires insurance on any motor vehicle that is on a highway. To view the Traffic Safety Act, please go to the following web link:

http://www.qp.alberta.ca/574.cfm?page=T06.cfm&leg_type=Acts&isbncln=9780779754281&display=html


Net, net....rear two wheels are on the road when using a dolly, hence insurance and registration is required on the car been towed on the dolly, as well as the dolly.

Need more info:
For further information please contact Howard Greenway, Vehicle Standards Specialist, 780-427-7573 or, email: Howard.Greenway@gov.ab.ca